“Zombies, Zombies, here they come!”  That fearful, dreaded word is heard cried out.
So like many of you, I am an avid gun collector and have a hundred guns, and maybe a box of ammo for each. Which one do I grab first? Zombie Apocalypse seems to be the new buzz word, or acceptable term used for preparing for total economic collapse of the free world or some type of invasion that would really only look cool in the movies.  Not one of us really wants to be toe to toe with another human being fighting for our life, but if that time were to come, we want to be ready.
The best caliber and the best gun are up to you. We can fill blogs, forums and web pages with our own opinions.  You just need to be able to run that gun, and hit what you are aiming at. It is not going to do you that much good if you have 5 guns, and twenty rounds of ammo each.  In case of an emergency, you will be either dragging or slinging another gun on your back for when you run out of ammo with the first gun, so you can then switch guns.  
My recommendation is to find a firearm you are comfortable with, and then stock up on that ammo. We rarely ever like buying the same gun twice as the money spent for the second gun could go into buying a new, cooler gun that we do not already have.  For example, if I have an 1100, and an 870, why would I want to buy another 870?  Here is one good reason why you may want to buy a duplicate firearm. If you feel that someday you may be feeding the family guns in an effort to protect the family compound, wouldn’t it be easier if all the guns and ammo were the same, or at least most of them being the same?  This could be very valuable if your family members are not used to shooting alot.  The actions would all work alike, the fire controls would be in the same spot, and the ammo would all be the same.  Less chance of confusion among the team when you least need more confusion.  Items like ammo and magazines would all be interchangeable.  By doing this, it could help assist your family in being a more proficient fighting machine.
Here is a good training scenario: the next time you have a malfunction while hunting, or shooting, instantly work through it.  Get that gun in a position to clear the jam, get that safety off, or whatever you forgot to do and get that round off. 
How many times I have seen people while hunting or target shooting have a malfunction.  They take the gun off their shoulder and just look at the gun in a puzzled manner.  How is this going to help in a life or death situation?  If this happens to you, you need to know how to deal with the problem and react without having to think.  This will only come with practice and training.
So get out there and shoot!


Family Firearms Preparedness

Instructor's Insights...